when can you drink carbonated drinks after tooth extraction
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When Can You Drink Carbonated Drinks After Tooth Extraction?

If you’re having a tooth extraction procedure soon, you surely have a lot of questions. After all, it is not something you should take lightly if you want it to go well.

If one of your questions is: when can you drink carbonated drinks after tooth extraction? You have come to the right place. The article will explain everything you need to know.

Why Are Carbonated Drinks Forbidden In the First Place?

Forbidden

Before you find out the answer to the question; when can you drink carbonated drinks after tooth extraction? you need to know why they are forbidden to begin with.

While the tooth extraction itself is not a difficult or painful process, you will experience quite a bit of discomfort in the days following it. You will likely have to deal with some minor bleeding and pain as the wound begins to heal.

In order for your gums to heal, a blood clot has to form and fill the tiny hole where the tooth used to be. It is important that you don’t do anything to disrupt this process, as that will prolong the recovery time and cause you unnecessary pain.

Now, there are certain substances that can dislodge and dissolve the blood clot in your mouth. These include all alcoholic beverages and carbonated drinks/sodas. Apart from messing with the blood clot, sodas can also irritate the extraction site and cause an infection. Such infections are notoriously hard to treat and can last for weeks and months.

Thus, you should not drink any carbonated drinks immediately following tooth extraction if you want your recovery to go as planned and without any issues.

So, When Can You Drink Carbonated Drinks After Tooth Extraction?

When

In most cases, the blood clot that fills the extraction site needs about 48 hours to form fully. That means that you will need to stay away from any carbonated drinks for just as long.

However, not everyone has the same experience when it comes to blood clotting. Some people might need more time, while others might need less. Thus, it might be better to wait a bit longer than just 48 hours. Waiting for a whole week might be the safest option, but if you can’t, three days is a good choice too.

In any case, it is best to ask your dentist what they think the best time frame might be. They have the experience necessary to predict how you might react and advise you accordingly. Follow their advice, and you should be fine.

What Happens After?

After

After the initial 48 hours (or more) are up, it should be safe for you to drink your favorite carbonated beverages again. At the 10 day mark, granulation tissue will start forming, and it will cover the hole completely.

The tissue will allow the whole site to heal nicely. Moreover, you won’t be feeling any pain and discomfort as this process begins. You will be able to eat and drink most foods and beverages without any issues.

At this point, it will be fully safe for you to drink sodas. They will not be able to cause any damage to the newly formed tissue, nor will they be able to seep under it.

Your dentist will most likely schedule a follow-up appointment two weeks after the procedure to check if everything is healing nicely. They might also discuss any other necessary treatment options with you.

If anything is amiss, they will simply give you advice on how to handle the situation. That might include watching what you eat and drink for a bit longer. However, such situations are rare.

Are There Any Other Beverages You Should Avoid?

Beverages

Apart from carbonated drinks, you should also stay away from any drinks high in acid in the first few days after tooth extraction. These include lemonade and orange juice. Moreover, you should avoid drinking anything hot.

Both acidic drinks and hot beverages can dislodge the blood clot forming at the extraction site, just like sodas. Thus, it is best to avoid them fully for at least three days and even more if you can bear it. That way, you will be able to heal completely, and you won’t feel any unnecessary discomfort.

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